August 2nd, 2012

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Americans love hamburgers- we eat about three burgers a week. But what are the hidden environmental costs? Find out in our new animated short!

July 12th, 2012

Study: Nearly 4 million Californians cannot afford enough food

An analysis [PDF], based on data from the California Health Interview Survey, found that more than 40 percent of low-income California adults in 2009 – 3.8 million in all – could not afford enough food at least once in the previous year. Read more.

September 7th, 2011

Banned berry pesticide still commonly used

In some of California’s top strawberry-growing counties, levels of banned methyl bromide remain nearly as high as they were a decade ago, despite a mandated phaseout, according to an analysis by New America Media.

The fumigant was supposed to have been phased out completely by 2005, under a global pact to halt the thinning of the earth’s protective ozone layer. But in 2009, the latest year for which data is available, more than 5 million pounds of the pesticide were still in use, down just 50 percent from 2000.

A limited amount of methyl bromide is allowed in instances in which no alternative exists, through a “critical use exemption,” determined by treaty members in a three-year process and administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Strawberry growers in California are among the groups that can apply for an exemption.

As a result, in a handful of the state’s highest strawberry production areas, methyl bromide is nearly as ubiquitous as it was in 1999, indicating that not all communities in the state are benefiting similarly from the phaseout. Read the full story.

Photo: MaryAnnShmueli/istockphoto.com Article used courtesy of New America Media.

July 29th, 2011

With few healthy options, teens eating more junk food

More than 2 million California children ages 12 to 17 – 58 percent – drink soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages every day, the center found. More than 1.6 million eat fast food at least twice a week.

Read more.

Photo: Christian Cable/Flickr

July 12th, 2011

Supermarket availability unrelated to diet, researchers say

Local, state and federal policies to reduce “food deserts” often call for less access to fast food and more access to supermarkets and grocery stores. But on their own, such policies may do little to promote healthier diets, according to a study released yesterday.

The implications are significant in California, where nearly 1 million people live in food deserts. A number of local and state policies aim to combat obesity and promote healthy diets by shaping neighborhood food environments.

Researchers found that living closer to fast food restaurants led to more fast food consumption – particularly among low-income men. But the availability of supermarkets and grocery stores generally was unrelated to diet quality and fruit and vegetable intake. Read the full report.

Photo: Anthony Albright/Flickr

June 14th, 2011
May 26th, 2011

An interesting Infographic from GOOD. School Cafeteria Food vs. Prison Food.

May 9th, 2011

Program helps grocery stores snuff out carbon footprint

Among climate scientists, it’s not the smorgasbord of foods and sundries in grocery stores and supermarkets that are concerning, but the large amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the buildings.

But that may change. On Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that supermarkets in all 50 states had promised to try to control these gases by voluntarily signing up for the agency’s GreenChill program.

The program’s aim is to help supermarkets reduce the amount of refrigerant emissions, greenhouse gas pollution and ozone-depleting gases escaping from the stores.

Several California-based stores and nationally recognized chains have signed up for the program, including Stater Bros., Lucky’s, Whole Foods and Target.

Supermarkets require large amounts of electricity to run lights, air conditioning and cash registers. But it’s the chemicals used to keep freezers, refrigerators and produce counters cool that are the largest threats. Read more

May 9th, 2011
Among climate scientists, it’s not the smorgasbord of foods and sundries in grocery stores and supermarkets that are concerning, but the large amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the buildings. But that may change. On Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that supermarkets in all 50 states had promised to try to control these gases by voluntarily signing up for the agency’s GreenChill program.
The program’s aim is to help supermarkets reduce the amount of refrigerant emissions, greenhouse gas pollution and ozone-depleting gases escaping from the stores. Several California-based stores and nationally recognized chains have signed up for the program, including Stater Bros., Lucky’s, Whole Foods and Target.
Supermarkets require large amounts of electricity to run lights, air conditioning and cash registers. But it’s the chemicals used to keep freezers, refrigerators and produce counters cool that are the largest threats.
(via Program helps grocery stores snuff out carbon footprint | California Watch)

Among climate scientists, it’s not the smorgasbord of foods and sundries in grocery stores and supermarkets that are concerning, but the large amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the buildings. But that may change. On Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that supermarkets in all 50 states had promised to try to control these gases by voluntarily signing up for the agency’s GreenChill program.

The program’s aim is to help supermarkets reduce the amount of refrigerant emissions, greenhouse gas pollution and ozone-depleting gases escaping from the stores. Several California-based stores and nationally recognized chains have signed up for the program, including Stater Bros., Lucky’s, Whole Foods and Target.

Supermarkets require large amounts of electricity to run lights, air conditioning and cash registers. But it’s the chemicals used to keep freezers, refrigerators and produce counters cool that are the largest threats.

(via Program helps grocery stores snuff out carbon footprint | California Watch)

May 5th, 2011

good:

Man, Long Beach is nailing it right now.

latimes:

The spirit of sharing is growing at Long Beach Community Garden. Jeff Spurrier reports:

At Long Beach Community Garden, known for its stunningly high yields, all gardeners dedicate 10% of their harvest to one of five local charitable organizations. (Other community gardens also donate to food banks, but at Long Beach the giving seems to be on an entirely different level.) The biggest recipient is the Long Beach Rescue Mission, which provides three meals a day to 250 people.

Photo credit: Ann Summa

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California Watch, the largest investigative journalism team operating in the state, was launched in 2009 by the nonprofit, nonpartisan Center for Investigative Reporting. Areas of coverage include education, health and welfare, public safety, the environment and the influence of money on the political and regulatory process.

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