September 30th, 2012

Volatile weather creates dramatic changes for California farmers

On the front lines of climate change, California’s agriculture industry faces a new landscape with less water, warmer winters, unexpected rain and rising salinity.

Our new “Heat and Harvest" series with KQED explores the challenges that farmers in the state are facing due to volatile weather conditions. Find out what’s at stake for this $30 billion industry — and your grocery bill.

Watch the full documentary here

Photo: Almond trees show signs of poisoning by exposure to salt. Rising salinity levels in irrigation water has farmers alarmed. Credit: Serene Fang/Center for Investigative Reporting

June 17th, 2011

Ever wonder just how hot it’s going to get in your town if the climate changes as scientists predict? Or whether your beachfront house is going to be underwater if sea levels rise?

The answers to those questions – and more – can now be accessed through a nifty interactive Internet tool designed by Google, in collaboration with the California Energy Commission, the U.S. Geological Survey, several California universities and others.

Read more

June 8th, 2011
According to our projections, large areas of the globe are likely to warm up so quickly that, by the middle of this century, even the coolest summers will be hotter than the hottest summers of the past 50 years.
Noah Diffenbaugh, Earth system science researcher at Stanford University and lead research of a Stanford study that finds furnace-hot temperatures soon may become the summer norm for North America. Read full story.
May 9th, 2011

Program helps grocery stores snuff out carbon footprint

Among climate scientists, it’s not the smorgasbord of foods and sundries in grocery stores and supermarkets that are concerning, but the large amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the buildings.

But that may change. On Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that supermarkets in all 50 states had promised to try to control these gases by voluntarily signing up for the agency’s GreenChill program.

The program’s aim is to help supermarkets reduce the amount of refrigerant emissions, greenhouse gas pollution and ozone-depleting gases escaping from the stores.

Several California-based stores and nationally recognized chains have signed up for the program, including Stater Bros., Lucky’s, Whole Foods and Target.

Supermarkets require large amounts of electricity to run lights, air conditioning and cash registers. But it’s the chemicals used to keep freezers, refrigerators and produce counters cool that are the largest threats. Read more

May 9th, 2011
Among climate scientists, it’s not the smorgasbord of foods and sundries in grocery stores and supermarkets that are concerning, but the large amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the buildings. But that may change. On Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that supermarkets in all 50 states had promised to try to control these gases by voluntarily signing up for the agency’s GreenChill program.
The program’s aim is to help supermarkets reduce the amount of refrigerant emissions, greenhouse gas pollution and ozone-depleting gases escaping from the stores. Several California-based stores and nationally recognized chains have signed up for the program, including Stater Bros., Lucky’s, Whole Foods and Target.
Supermarkets require large amounts of electricity to run lights, air conditioning and cash registers. But it’s the chemicals used to keep freezers, refrigerators and produce counters cool that are the largest threats.
(via Program helps grocery stores snuff out carbon footprint | California Watch)

Among climate scientists, it’s not the smorgasbord of foods and sundries in grocery stores and supermarkets that are concerning, but the large amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the buildings. But that may change. On Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that supermarkets in all 50 states had promised to try to control these gases by voluntarily signing up for the agency’s GreenChill program.

The program’s aim is to help supermarkets reduce the amount of refrigerant emissions, greenhouse gas pollution and ozone-depleting gases escaping from the stores. Several California-based stores and nationally recognized chains have signed up for the program, including Stater Bros., Lucky’s, Whole Foods and Target.

Supermarkets require large amounts of electricity to run lights, air conditioning and cash registers. But it’s the chemicals used to keep freezers, refrigerators and produce counters cool that are the largest threats.

(via Program helps grocery stores snuff out carbon footprint | California Watch)

April 22nd, 2011

What’s your carbon footprint?

 David Blaikie/FlickrFor a single-person household earning less than $10,000, living in California, the annual carbon footprint is about 16 tons of greenhouse gasses. But for a couple earning $90,000 living in the Bay Area, it’s about 57 tons annually. That is almost the same as a family of five living in St. Louis, with half of the annual income.

See what your carbon footprint is by going to coolcalifornia.org.

April 22nd, 2011

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Today is Earth Day! To celebrate, watch a clip from our documentary Dirty Business: “Clean Coal” and the Battle for Our Energy Future. America burns more than a billion tons of coal a year—and coal-fired power plants are the single greatest source of the greenhouse gases that cause global warming. Dirty Business investigates the true cost of our dependence on coal for electricity in the age of climate change.

Learn more about the film

April 21st, 2011
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@CaliforniaWatch

California Watch, the largest investigative journalism team operating in the state, was launched in 2009 by the nonprofit, nonpartisan Center for Investigative Reporting. Areas of coverage include education, health and welfare, public safety, the environment and the influence of money on the political and regulatory process.

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